Nonsensical Whatnotterist

ruth0007:

rosa-encantadora:

"It’s no crime to be alive!"

"No, my dear, sometimes it’s a great inconvenience. The living can be hurt."

This is one of my favorite childhood movies I would watch on television with my mom.  *swoons*

Ohhhhh!  One of my ALL TIME FAVS and I cry every single time, too!  Happy crying, but still.  Oh, the tears.  <3

endsequence:

agentotter:

gottsthoughts:

Take time to balter.

I had no idea there was a word for me.

I am a professional balterer.

I balter like anything in the kitchen when I&#8217;m getting my cooking-fu on! 

endsequence:

agentotter:

gottsthoughts:

Take time to balter.

I had no idea there was a word for me.

I am a professional balterer.

I balter like anything in the kitchen when I’m getting my cooking-fu on! 

vaginal-diabetus:

I want to know what happened in the cut footage from the gay club on stag night.

Dudes hitting on Sherlock left and right and John getting more and more jealous until he drags Sherlock out of there by the coat collar?

Frottage in the bathroom?  

Guy pulling Sherlock onto the dance floor and grinding against him while John adjusts himself in his trousers?! I NEED TO KNOW.

Sounds like there needs to be waaaaay lots more fic than exists yet.  FICCERS ASSEMBLE! \o/

(wouldn’t it be cool if that worked, though?)

destinationtoast:

Last night, Mrs. Toasty came up with a better term for fan service: fandering!

I am incorporating this brilliant addition to the language into my own Random-Speak. *slams hand down on desk* SO THERE!

On black and white thinking

roane72:

I’m seeing a lot of stuff on my dash tonight that’s depressing the shit out of me, and I have a million things I’m trying to do, but I wanted to say a few things.

There is a hell of a lot of black and white thinking going on in my fandom right now, and I’m vacillating between being pissed off about it and being sad about it.

Some of the splitting I’m seeing:

  • You ship Johnlock (and believe it’s going to be canon) or else you’re a homophobe
  • You love Mary or else you’re a misogynist
  • You love Moffat or you’re a terrible fan
  • You hate Moffat or you’re a sexist

Guys? STOP. The world does not work like this. The world is not black or white. Nothing is clear-cut or simple 100% of the time. There is no either/or here. Stop drawing lines between fans where they don’t exist. Everyone brings a lifetime of experiences and feelings to a fandom. And someone’s fandom choices are not a direct representative of the kind of person they are. 

Stop name-calling because someone doesn’t ship the same ship exactly the way you do. Stop assuming you know someone’s personal and political beliefs on the basis of which fictional couple(s) they do or do not want to read about/see boinking.

And stop for the love of god being so freaking concerned about being RIGHT. This is fandom. There is no ‘right’. There’s canon and not-canon, that’s it.

Start remembering that there are actual human beings behind that screen name, human beings that have bad days, that have problems and issues just like you do, and are here because they love a TV show—just like you do.

People are getting hurt—seriously hurt—because a handful of people insist that black-and-white thinking is the only option. It’s time the rest of us, with broader vision, started speaking up. 

blameitonthepatriarchy:

I am sick and tired of the way we critique misogyny in fandom. 

Why is it always “shame fanwork creators (overwhelmingly young women and queer ppl) for not including enough female characters” and never “question the fact that we’ve created a media culture where canonical female characters are by and large so boring that no one wants to create fanworks based on them?” (Not to mention the fact that any person who dares to include an original female character in a fic will have the deadly accusation of “Mary Sue” leveled at them, even if they’ve written the most well-rounded character in the world)

Why do we talk about the danger of fetishization when straight women are writing about male/male pairings, and never think about the fact that slash is often being written by young women who have been socialized to be so ashamed of their sexuality that their own fantasies never include people of their own gender?

Why are we placing the burden for destroying problematic tropes about sexuality and romance exclusively on this tiny, relatively powerless subculture made up of relatively powerless people who are creating media exclusively for their own enjoyment, and not on the gigantic megacorporations that are profiting off the romanticization of abusive, unhealthy, destructive relationships, an attitude fans are only repeating?

Why do defenses of fic always turn to “it’s not all gay porn !!!1!!!!111” as an argument? What’s wrong with people creating erotica that they can enjoy, when almost no one is making mainstream porn for the audience that reads fic, when people can explore potentially problematic or even dangerous kinks/desires without actual performers having to participate in making video porn, when the “gay porn” side of fandom can lead to some of the most wonderfully freeing discussions about sexuality possible in our society?

Say I write a fanfiction. The only female character complies to the problematic sassy/helpful best friend trope, mostly because the story revolves around two main male characters (well-developed in canon, with lots of canon jokes about how much they love each other, and played by male actors I find extremely attractive) getting together and having a fair amount of extremely explicit sex. This fic is read by, oh, 200 people, all of whom are already familiar with the conventions of fandom. How does that compare to the literal millions of people who watched, for example, the first Hobbit movie, which contained (as I recall) no women or queer characters at all, and had an audience full of all kinds of people, likely including little girls who are looking up on screen and learning that their stories aren’t seen as worth telling?

I’m not saying fandom tropes aren’t harmful, I’m just saying we should look at the scope of the damage done by them as opposed to, oh, every other kind of media ever, and then think about why we’ve chosen to shit all over the not-for-profit hobbies of young women and queer people.

Attention All Cumberbatch Fans!

eclaireevans:

junejuly15:

skulls-and-tea:

impossiblysherlock:

Borrowed from /u/IDoDash on Reddit. Please read this!

Okay, fellow Cumberfans, can we have a quick chat about the upcoming Hamlet business? I know I’m not alone in my excitement about the possibility of getting tickets to the production in 2015, and I plan to make a genuine effort to do so - as I know so many of you will as well.

If/when any of us are lucky enough to get in a seat at the Barbican next year, can we all agree to be on our best behavior during the performance? YES, Benedict is attractive. YES, there’s a possibility he will be in tights.OBVIOUSLY, his performance will be brilliant, swoon-worthy, etc.

Does that mean there should be uncontrollable cat-calls from the audience whenever he sets foot on stage? image

Should collective cries of “Squeeeee!” erupt whenever he does something particularly adorable? NO. image

Is it OK for people in the audience take photos and/or secretly film the performance, thinking they are being sneaky but managing to be totally obvious in the process?

 image

Let’s all be respectful of both Ben and the other performers as well as the rest of the audience. Help them put on the best performance they can and have just as amazing of an experience as you’re having. Don’t be “that guy” in the front row causing a distraction. Please?

I would greatly appreciate it if you guys could please reblog this so as many of Benedict’s fans can see. This might be a serious problem, and it’s not fair to the rest of the guests who want to watch the show, regardless of who the actors are. Thank you.

Guys, this is so important. Benedict has wanted to play Hamlet since he was seventeen. Let’s not fuck this up for him with dolphin noises and camera-flashes or throngs blocking sidewalks at all the theater exits.

I want to be able to hear a fucking mouse’s sneeze during Hamlet’s monologues. I want Ben to get home easily after his performances, glowing with standing-ovation satisfaction and blissfully unharassed. I am so serious. Show some respect to one of the greatest works of the Bard, and act like fans Ben can be proud of.

This is all self-evident, isn’t it? Everybody is aware that respect is the key word here. And not only respect for Benedict, but for each and every one who will be on stage in that performance :)

image

Reblogging again as text because this is SO IMPORTANT! Don’t make him regret doing this. Don’t make him regret waiting to find a location that will cater to his huge number of fans. Don’t make him regret doing live theatre when he could be walled off filming in some podunk town in the middle of the swamp. (Hi there, filming for 12 Years a Slave. Why was Benedict’s plantation way out in the middle of nowhere when everyone else was less than 20 minutes from the city? Just curious.) Anyway. Be RESPECTFUL. Please. Catch more flies with honey and all that. Basic operant conditioning. We don’t want to train avoidance.

autistic-alligator:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]
deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.
I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.
Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.
If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.
At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.
During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.
The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.
There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.
We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.
In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:
Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.
This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?
Thank you for reading.

I think I’ve left some good information in this response and it may be a good read for some of our followers.  Just a bit of history and a couple concepts in disability advocacy.
~Sam

autistic-alligator:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]

deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.

I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.

Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.

If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.

At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.

During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.

The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.

There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.

We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.

In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:

  • Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
  • Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
  • In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
  • Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.

This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?

Thank you for reading.

I think I’ve left some good information in this response and it may be a good read for some of our followers.  Just a bit of history and a couple concepts in disability advocacy.

~Sam

reapersun:

every time i see that khan shower scene on my dash i kind of cringe inwardly and  i think of all the ways they could have made it less awkward if the director had even tried it’s like he didn’t know how to make a dudeshower sexy and then i think IF ONLY I HAD BEEN THERE it would have been like

image

but then it would have also been like

image

haleboundride:

thank you.

to those of you in the fandom who are kind to others.

who are considerate of the fact that not everyone has the same opinion.

who understand that we each have the right to love whichever storylines and characters we want.

who treat other members of fandom with respect and care.

you are out there, you exist, and you are why there are still safe spaces in this fandom.

thank you.

MY UTERUS FEELS LIKE IT HAS BEEN STABBED BY A MORGUL BLADE
My older sister giving an incredibly accurate description of period cramps.  (via thiscolourblue)

owlturdcomix:

The might of Cthulhu.

roane72:

fuckyeahfanficflamingo:

[TRY TO WRITE A DRABBLE (Fanfic Flamingo) OOPS IT’S A NOVEL]

AHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.

This will prolly be read at my funeral, because my entire writing existence has mostly danced to this little tune.  So. Damned. True.

roane72:

fuckyeahfanficflamingo:

[TRY TO WRITE A DRABBLE (Fanfic Flamingo) OOPS IT’S A NOVEL]

AHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.

This will prolly be read at my funeral, because my entire writing existence has mostly danced to this little tune.  So. Damned. True.

DEAR TUMBLR STAFF

a-paradox-of-feels:

A “Sent” folder.

A notification when someone answers your ask.

image